Phases of Perspective Transformation

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Phases of Perspective Transformation

Phases of Perspective Transformation

Phase 1 – Identify the disorienting dilemma of this case.

This step typically results from the convergence of several “disquieting” events or experiences that tend to upset the equilibrium within the organization and its stakeholders. What are some of the significant areas of concern presented in this case? Identify the most immediate areas of concern – the disorienting dilemmas. State the dilemma(s) in simple terms.

Phase 2 – Self-examination (Look)

This phase involves deep introspection about the problems or situations. Engagement with this phase might entail stakeholders having critical conversations about the significant issues. Questions that might facilitate organizational self-examination include:

  • What are the major issues? How are they interconnected?
  • In what ways do the school’s problems impede the goal of building resiliency in the school setting?
  • What specific personnel or organizational adjustments will have to be made if the major issues are to be resolved?
  • Assess the school’s strengths and weaknesses in the following areas:
    1. Caring Relationships
    2. High Expectations
    3. Opportunities for Participation and Contribution

Phase 3 – Critical analysis of assumptions (Think)

This phase requires stakeholders to examine their assumptions about people, places, things, or circumstances that could inhibit or facilitate change. Such assumptions should be deconstructed, critically assessed, and reconstructed in ways that enable movement toward the desired goal. Questions include the following:

  • Does everyone in the organization look at the issue in the same way? What are the points of departure and convergence?
  • What are the likely sources (or root causes) of problems in the following areas?
    1. Caring Relationships
    2. High Expectations
    3. Opportunities for Participation and Contribution
  • As a group, assess how Meier’s five questions on critical consciousness are being addressed? (Meier, 1995).
    1. How do we know what we know?
    2. Who’s speaking?
    3. What causes what?
    4. How might things have been different?
    5. Who cares?
  • What programs and policies need to be adjusted to support the implementation of protective factors in the school setting in each of the categories?
    1. Caring Relationships
    2. High Expectations
    3. Opportunities for Participation and Contribution

Phase 4 – Recognition that one’s discontent and the process of transformation are shared

This phase assumes that the stakeholders’ level of discontent with circumstances will serve as a motivator for change leading to transformation. Questions that might help to clarify the situation include:

  • What prohibits the organization/community from reaching the desired goal of resiliency?
  • What would be the consequences if the desired change were not made?

Phase 5 – Exploration of options: New roles, relationships, and actions

If change is warranted, stakeholders have to explore new roles, options, relationships, and actions, along with long-term and short-term implications. Exploratory considerations might include:

  • Ensure that the new program addresses all of the areas outlined below:
    1. Caring Relationships
    2. High Expectations
    3. Opportunities for Participation and Contribution
  • For the given scenario, what would be the ideal solution?

Phase 6 – Planning a course of action (Act)

Planning a new course of action entails developing a set of action steps for activating protective factors in the school setting and taking the plan to build resiliency to the next level.  Guiding questions might include:

  • What steps must be taken to reach an ideal formulated by the group? (The “new ideal” must be contextual and may vary from school to school.)
  • What new roles and relationships should be cultivated to advance movement toward resiliency?
  • What is the relative difficulty of implementing each protective factor?
  • What are other details that need to be considered in an action plan? (i.e., “who, what, when, where, why, and how”).

Phase 7 – Acquiring knowledge and skills for implementing the plan

This phase involves helping stakeholders acquire knowledge and skills needed to implement an action plan. This list of skill-building activities does not need to be all inclusive but should provide stakeholders opportunities to build competence in critical areas. Questions to be addressed at this phase include:

  • What are the organization’s/stakeholders’ current strengths and weaknesses about the achievement of resiliency protective factors?
    1. Caring Relationships
    2. High Expectations
    3. Opportunities for Participation and Contribution
  • What resources are accessible to help stakeholders build competence and self-confidence in their redefined roles and relationships?

Phase 8 – Provisional trying of new roles

This phase involves stakeholders practicing acquired skills and acquiring experiences. Questions to be considered at this phase include:

  • What new skills and knowledge have stakeholders acquired to nurture protective factors?
    1. Caring Relationships
    2. High Expectations
    3. Opportunities for Participation and Contribution
  • What lessons have stakeholders learned so far?
  • What additional opportunities exist for growth and development?

Phase 9 – Building competence and self-confidence in new roles and relationships

Building competence and self-confidence entails involvement in opportunities to improve performance in the new role(s).

  • Develop a tentative list of possible opportunities for building competence and self-confidence.
  • What are the costs involved in pursuing each opportunity?

Phase 10 – Reintegration into one’s life of conditions dictated by one’s new perspective

For this phase, reintegration is defined as what occurs after a radical change has been completed. Questions include:

  • In what ways are the stakeholders equipped to apply newfound skills and insights to achieving and sustaining resiliency?
  • In what ways should the organization or stakeholder invest materially, intellectually, physically, and emotionally to sustain resiliency?
  • What mechanisms will be used for the organization or stakeholder to engage in constant reflection and revision of the goal to promote resiliency?

Sources:

Reed, L. C. (2017). The agape alternative. Chicago, IL: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Reed, L. C. (2017). Transforming middle schools: A staff development workshop manual. Chicago, IL: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Reed, L. C. (2017). Transforming school culture: A case study approach. Chicago, IL: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

 

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